double dummy for non dummies


                                                         Double Dummy 1 - The Merrimac Coup
This is where a  defender sacrifices a high card in order to eliminate a vital entry from an opponent's hand. It was named after American steam ship Merrimac, which was sunk during the Spanish- American War in 1898 in Santiago de Cuba in an attempt to bottle up the Spanish fleet.

Mission: should you (East) decide to accept it, is to set 3 No Trump. As always, should you or your partner fail, we will disavow any knowledge of your actions. This e-mail will self-destruct in 5 seconds. Good luck.

Conditions: The bidding is fairly automatic; 
1 NT ===> 3 NT. West's opening lead is the 3 $. East wins with the Ace and goes into the tank. If partner had the King Queen Jack (or even the 10), he would have led the K$. Therefore Declarer has a Spade stopper. Once my
" is knocked out there will be 6 tricks in Dummy, a Spade and 5 Diamonds; and most likely 2 Clubs (or a Club and a Heart ) in the closed hand. That's 9 tricks and the contract. Must keep Declarer from running those Diamonds. But how?

Penultimate Solution: Hold up with the A" is an obvious solution. But that seems a bit futile since the
A ! is the entry to Dummy. The only way out is to blow up the A! . The Bridge weapon of mass destruction, known as the Merrimac Coup, has to be deployed.

Ultimate Solution: The A ! as to be removed from Dummy immediately. The only way to do it is to play a Heart  But which one? If a low Heart is played, Declarer wins with the Queen in her hand and starts the Diamonds. After your Ace is knocked out she still has the A ! in Dummy as an entry to the good Diamonds. Playing the K ! does give Declarer 2 Heart tricks, but still not enough to make the hand. Declarer makes: 1 Spades, 3 Hearts, 2 Diamonds and 2 Clubs for a total of 8 tricks; down 1.  If the Merrimac Coup is not use the Declarer makes: 1 Spade, 1 Heart, 5 Diamonds and 2 Clubs for a total of 9 tricks; making 3 NT.

Intro: A Double Dummy is not a Bridge hand with two dummies, but a Bridge problem in which a person is presented with all four hands and is asked to determine the course of play that will achieve or defeat a particular contract. Since all four hands are in view, the Declarer play and/or Defense are unusually unique. These hands are illustrative rather than actual and the solutions are often Missions Impossible.
Good Bridge is more than just having a good memory. (Good memory is important so don't forget to take your memory pills in the morning.)  But also strategery, step out of the box, be innovative. Here is a chance to make the unusual, unexpected play, one that might cause your partner to shake his head and leave the room.


        DD 1             NORTH
                    $ 7 4               
                    ! A 6                 
                    " K Q 10 8 7 2      
                    # 9 3 2              
       
WEST                                 EAST
$ Q 10 6 3 2                      $ A 8 5   
! 10 8 5                            ! K 9 4 2
"5                                    "A 6 3
# Q 6 5 4                          # 10 8 7

                     SOUTH (dealer)
                    $ K J 9                   
                    ! Q J 7 3      
                   "J 9 4            
                    # A K J                                          
             


 


DD 1             NORTH
                    $ 7 4               
                    ! A 6                 
                    "K Q 10 8 7 2      
                    # 9 3 2              
       
WEST                                 EAST
$ Q 10 6 3 2                      $ A 8 5   
! 10 8 5                            ! K 9 4 2
" 5                                   " A 6 3
Q 6 5 4                         # 10 8 7

                     SOUTH (dealer)
                    $ K J 9                   
                    ! Q J 7 3      
                   " J 9 4            
                    # A K J                                          

                                   


DOUBLE DUMMY 2
Conditions: East bid 5 Diamonds over
 partner's bid of 4 Hearts. You bid 5 Hearts
followed by 3 passes. . West opens the K".
Declarer has  to win with the Ace. You see
2 Spade losers and 1 Club loser which add up to down one. The Club loser is unavoidable.

The 3 ways of getting rid of losers are:
dump, trump (not Donald) or finesse. 3 Spades
in the hand opposite 3 Spades in Dummy rule
out ruffing a Spade loser. Since there is only
one Spade honor (the Ace) there is no finesse. That leaves dumping a Spade loser on a winner which means setting up the Club suit. Problem is that with the Diamond opening lead there is a shortage of entries into Dummy. .

Mission: Should you decide to accept it, is to make   
5 Hearts, whether East, after winning trick 2 with a high Club, returns a Spade or a Diamond. As always, should you or your partner fail, we will disavow any knowledge of your actions. This email will self-destruct in 5 seconds. Good luck.

Penultimate Solution: Win the opening King of  Diamonds lead with the Ace and play the 2 #. Win the Spade return but not the Diamond return. If you trump a Diamond in dummy you will give up an entry and be set.

Ultimate Solution: Set up the long suit (Clubs) by playing the  A # then trumping a Club with the K $. Now pull trump winning the last one with the A !. Now play Clubs dumping the losing Diamond and the 2 losing Spades. Note: playing the 2 # was a key play because it kept the A # as an entry. Bridge is a game of communication.










DD 2
              NORTH                                                  $  6 4 3
                      !  A 7 2      
                      "  A
                      # A 9 6 4 3 2     


     WEST                            EAST 
 $ 10 9 8 7                       $ K Q J 
 !  5                                ! 9 6 3  
 " K Q 10 9 7                  " J 8 6 4 3 
  # Q 10 7                         #   K J 

                        SOUTH  
                      $ A 5 3                                                ! K Q J 10 8 4                                     " 2                                                       # 8 5